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ORD OF THE 



IVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



CHAPEL HILL 



UARY 20, 1972 



NUMBER 770 



THE SCHOOL OF 
SOCIAL WORK 



UNCEMENTS FOR THE SESSION 1972-1973 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



(Six Component Institutions) 



WILLIAM CLYDE FRIDAY, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

WILLIAM SMITH WELLS, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Vice President— Academic Affairs 

(resigned September 1, 1971) 

ARNOLD KIMSEY KING, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Vice President— Institutional Studies 

HERMAN BROOKS JAMES, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President— Research and 
Public Service Programs 

L FELIX JOYNER, A.B., Vice President— Finance 



By the act of the General Assembly of 1931 the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro, and the 
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh were 
merged into The University of North Carolina. 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1963 effective July 1, 1963, The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina comprised: The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and North Carolina State 
of The University of North Carolina at Raleigh. 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1965 effective July 1, 1965, The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina comprised: The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, The University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte, and North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

By the act of the General Assembly of 1969 effective July 1, 1969, The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina comprises: The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, The University of North Carolina at Asheville, The University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, The 
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and North Carolina State University 
at Raleigh. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed 
by a chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and 
appropriate allocation of function are effected by a single Board of Trustees 
and by the President with other administrative officers of The University. The) 
general administration offices are located in Chapel Hill. 

Members of the Board of Trustees are elected by the Legislature, and the 
Governor of North Carolina is chairman ex officio. 

The chancellors of the component institutions are responsible to the 
President as the principal executive officer of The University of North Carolina 



Record of the 

University of 
North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Announcements for 1972-1973 

JANUARY 20, 1972 NUMBER 770 

II 



CALENDAR 1972 







JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


APRIl 

S M T W T f S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 II 12 13 14 15 
16 17 16 19 20 21 22 
)j jo "ji 25 26 27 28 ">9 


1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
"jo 24 25 26 27 28 29 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 


JUNE 

S M I W T F S 


JUIY 

S M T w T F S 


AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
'«„ 25 26 27 28 29 


1 2 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 


OCTOBER 
S M I W T F S 


NOVEMBER 
S M T w I F S 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T f S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 IS 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 1 I 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 M 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


I 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
>♦„ 25 26 27 28 29 30 



CALENDAR 1973 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 


MARCH 
S M T W T S 


APRIL 

S M T W T- F S 


I 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 1112 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 


JUNE 

S M T W T f S 


JULY 

S M T W T F S 


AUGUST 
S M T W T f S 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 IS 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T f S 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 


NOVEMBER 
S M T W T f S 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 U 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
»,o 24 25 26 27 28 29 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 1112 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
"so ">i 25 26 27 28 2* 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
1972-1973 



SUMMER SESSION, 1972 
First Term 

May 29-30, Monday-Tuesday 

May 31, Wednesday 

June 1, Thursday 

June 5, Monday 

July 3, Monday 

July 4, Tuesday 

July 5-6, Wednesday-Thursday 

Second Term 

July 7, Friday 

July 10, Monday 

July 11, Tuesday 

July 12, Wednesday 

August 12, Saturday 

August 14-15, Monday-Tuesday 



FALL SEMESTER, 1972 

August 23, Wednesday 
I August 24-25, Thursday-Friday 
\ August 28-30, Monday-Wednesday 
i August 31, Thursday 
' November 22, Wednesday, 1:00 P.M. 
i November 27, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 
I December 8, Friday 
! December 9-11, Saturday-Monday 
! December 12-21, Tuesday-Thursday 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1973 

January 8, Monday 

January 9, Tuesday 

January 10, Wednesday 

March 12, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

March 19, Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

April 26, Thursday 

April 27-29, Friday-Sunday 

April 30-May 9, Monday-Wednesday 

May 13, Sunday 



Opening Days: Residence Halls open. 

Counseling of students. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for late registration. 

Last day of classes for first term. 

Holiday— Reading Day. 

Examinations according to schedule. 



Opening day: Residence Halls open. 

Counseling of students. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for late registration. 

Reading Day. 

Examinations according to schedule. 



Fall Semester opens. 

Freshman orientation, testing. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins. 

Instruction resumed. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading days. 

Final examinations. 



Spring Semester opens. 

Registration. 

First day of classes. 

Spring vacation begins 

Instruction resumed. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading days. 

Final examinations. 

Commencement. 



CONTENTS 

CALENDAR / 5 
ADMINISTRATION / 7 
FACULTY / 8 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK / 14 
ADMISSION / 18 
SCHOLARSHIPS / 19 
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS / 20 
FEES AND EXPENSES / 21 
HOUSING / 21 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE / 21 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION / 23 
ENROLLED STUDENTS / 28 

EXCERPTS FROM UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS / 33 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 

NELSON FEREBEE TAYLOR, LL.B., Chancellor 

CLAIBORNE STRIBLING JONES, Ph.D., Assistant to the Chancellor 

CORNELIUS OLIVER CATHEY, Ph.D., Dean of Student Affairs 

JOSEPH COLIN EAGLES, JR., J.D., Vice Chancellor, Business and Finance 

LILLIAN YOUNGS LEHMAN, Ph.D., Registrar and Director of Institutional Re- 
search 

LYLE VINCENT JONES, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School and Vice Chancellor 
CECIL GEORGE SHEPS, M.D., Vice Chancellor, Health Sciences 
JOHN CHARLES MORROW III, Ph.D., Provost 

CHARLES MILTON SHAFFER, B.S., Comm., Director of Developmental Affairs 

THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

MORTON IRVING TEICHER, M.S.W., Ph.D., Dean* 

ALAN KEITH-LUCAS, M.A. (Cantab.), M.Sc, Ph.D., Director of Extended Services, 
Acting Dean- 

HANSEL H. HOLLINGSWORTH, M.S.W., Associate Dean 
ALBERT WARREN KING, M.S.W., Assistant to the Dean 
ANDREW W. DOBELSTEIN, M.S.W., Director of Admissions 
GEORGIE P. HUGHES, M.S.W., Coordinator, Field Instruction 

Administrative Board 4 

WILLIAM LEROY FLEMING, B.A., M.S., M.D., Professor of Preventive Medicine 
and Assistant Dean of the School of Medicine for Education and Research 
(1972) 

DONALD BALES HAYMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Public Law and Government and 
Assistant Director of the Institute of Government (1972) 

WILLIAM FRED MAYES, B.S., M.D., M.P.H., Dean of the School of Public Health 
(1972) 

JOHN ALBERT PARKER, M.Arch., M.C.P., Professor of Planning (1972) 

EUZELIA CAMOLENE SMART, M.S., Associate Professor of Clinical Social Work, 
Section of Allied Professional Education, School of Medicine (1972) 

HARVEY L. SMITH, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology in the Department of Soci- 
ology, Clinical Professor of Sociology in the Department of Psychiatry, 
Research Professor in the Institute for Research in Social Science, and 
Director of the Social Research Section of the Division of Health Affairs 
(1972) 

1. Effective July 1, 1972. 

2. Until June 30, 1972. 

3. The Chancellor, the Provost, the Director of Admissions of the University, and 
the Dean of Student Affairs are ex officio members of the Administrative Board. 

4. Dates indicate expiration of terms. 



8 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



FACULTY 

EUGENE D. ANDERSON, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
WILLIAM E. BAKEWELL, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry 
BARBARA HENRY CLEAVELAND, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
MORRIS H. COHEN, M.A., M.Sc, Associate Professor of Social Work and Direc- 
tor of Community Action Training Center 
PHILIP WAYNE COOKE, M.S.W., D.S.W., Professor of Social Work 
HOPE W. DAVIS, M.A., Lecturer and Assistant to Director of Extended Services 
HARRY L DERR, JR., M.S.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
ANDREW W. DOBELSTEIN, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
ARTHUR E. FINK, M.S.W., Ph.D., Professor of Social Work and Research Associ- 
ate in The Institute for Research in Social Science 
MAEDA J. GALINSKY, M.S.W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work and 

Research Associate in The Institute for Research in Social Science 
PAULA LIPNICK GOLDSMID, M.S., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
ELAINE L. GOOLSBY, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work and Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Social Work in Section of Allied Educational Programs and 
Department of Pediatrics 
GERALDINE GOURLEY, M.S., Associate Professor of Maternal and Child Health 

and Social Work 
RUTH B. GREEN, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
NANCY M. HALL, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
JEAN DODD HAMBRIGHT, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Consultant 
WESTON HARE, M.A., Lecturer and Training Specialist 
H. CARL HENLEY, JR., M.S.P.H., Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Work 
GERALD M. HOLDEN, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 

HANSEL H. HOLLINGSWORTH, M.S.W., Associate Dean and Lecturer in Social 
Work 

GEORGIE P. HUGHES, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Co- 
ordinator, Field Instruction 
ALBERT L. JOHNSON, M.A., M.P.H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work 

and Assistant Professor of Public Health Administration 
ALAN KEITH-LUCAS, M.A. (Cantab.), M.Sc, Ph.D., Alumni Distinguished Pro- 
fessor of Social Work, Acting Dean, Director of Extended Services, and 
Field Consultant, Group Child Care Consultant Services 
ALBERT WARREN KING, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work and Assist- 
ant to the Dean 
SHARON I. LANIER, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
HORTENSE KING McCLINTON, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
ALSI ROBINETTE McKINNON, M.A., Assistant Professor of Social Work 
CAROLYN LAW OTEY, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Instructor 
MARY H. PEGRAM, M.S.W., Lecturer and Field Consultant, Work-Study Program 
JANE H. PFOUTS, M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work 
JANICE H. SCHOPLER, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work 



The School of Social Work 



9 



EUZELIA C. SMART, M.S., Associate Professor, School of Social Work and 
School of Medicine and Hospital 

Part-time Lecturers 

DOROTHY C. BERNHOLZ, A.B., Lecturer 

ALBERT C. CAPEHART, JR., M.Div., M.Ed., Director, New Careers Program, 

Operation Breakthrough, Inc., Durham, North Carolina 
DOROTHY GAMBLE, M.S.W., Inter-Church Council for Social Services, Chapel 

Hill, North Carolina 

LEE D. KITTREDGE, M.A., Lecturer, Department of Sociology, University of 
North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina 

CONSTANTINE G. KLEDARAS, M.S.W., D.S.W., Assistant Professor, Department 
of Social Work and Correctional Services, East Carolina University, Green- 
ville, North Carolina 

JOSEPH E. KLUG, M.S.W., Director of Special Projects, United Community 
Services, Charlotte, North Carolina 

RAYMOND S. LEDFORD, M.S., Director, Lee County Welfare Department, San- 
ford, North Carolina. 

ROBERT PERSON, JR., M.S.W., Executive Director, Charlotte Area Fund, Inc., 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

JAMES ALLEN WIGHT, M.S.W., Director, Craven County Department of Social 
Services, New Bern, North Carolina 

Faculty of Group Child Care Consultant Services 

SAMUEL R. FUDGE, B.D., M.S.W., Executive Director 
ROBERT L. COATES, M.S.W., Field Consultant 
MARJORIE L. FARADAY, M.S.W., Field Consultant 
H. CARL HENLEY, JR., M.S.P.H., Ph.D., Research Specialist 
i ALAN KEITH-LUCAS, M.A. (Cantab.), M.Sc, Ph.D., Field Consultant 
ERWIN H. PLUMER, M.S.S.S., Field Consultant 

CLIFFORD W. SANFORD, M.A., Field Consultant and Director of Training 

Staff 

DOLORES L. BURKE, Administrative Assistant 
! EVELYN PATRINA EDWARDS 
GORDON B. FINCH, JR. 
CYNTHIA GAIL HAFFLER 
JANE C. KIRKLAND 
MARY M. MAYBREY 
;JACQUELIN S. PERRY 
GRACE T. WILSON 



10 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Field Instructors (Fall Term, 1971*) 



MARY LEE ANDERSON 

Wake Co. Dept. of Social Services 

Raleigh, N. C. 

SARAH AUSTIN 

Family Services Agency 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

LYNNE BENSON 

New Hanover Dept. of Social Services 
Wilmington, N. C. 
CAROLINA BLUE 
Western Carolina Center 
Morganton, N. C. 
S. P. BRADSHER 

New Hanover Dept. of Social Services 

Wilmington, N. C. 

BILL BRITTAIN 

Methodist Home for Children 

Raleigh, N. C. 

ARETA CALLOWAY 

N. C. Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

GERALDINE CALLOWAY 

Wake Co. Dept. of Social Services 

Raleigh, N. C. 

DOYLE CAMPBELL 

Family Mental Health Service 

Hickory, N. C. 

RALPH CAUTHEN 

Dept. of Social Services 

Model Cities Program 

High Point, N. C. 

LOUISE COPELAND 

John Umstead Hospital 

Butner, N. C. 

HALLIE COPPEDGE 

Veterans Administration Hospital 

Durham, N. C. 

BEN CROMER 

N. C. Dept. of Social Services 
Special Services Division 
Raleigh, N. C. 
DOROTHY CURLEE 
Children's Home Society 
Greensboro, N. C. 



ELEANOR DeMARCO 

Methodist Home for Children 

Raleigh, N. C. 

WILLIAM EASTMAN 

UNC Student Health Service 

N. C. Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

CORTLAND EDWARDS 

Family & Children Services Section 

N. C. Dept. of Social Services 

Raleigh, N. C. 

ANN ELLIS 

W. H. Trentman Mental Health Center 

Raleigh, N. C. 

JEAN FITZGERALD 

New Hanover Dept. of Social Services 

Wilmington, N. C. 

JOHN FREAS 

Youth Services Bureau 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

MAX FUNDERBURKE 

Stanley Co. Mental Health Clinic 

Albemarle, N. C. 

MICHAEL GIBSON 

McDowell Co. Dept. of Social Services 

Marion, N. C. 

ELAINE GOOLSBY 

N. C. Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

CAROLYN GREENE 

Y.W.C.A. 

Durham, N. C. 

MARY COOKE GREENE 

Family Services Agency 

Greensboro, N. C. 

PATRICIA GUSTAVESON 

State Dept. of Social Services 

Raleigh, N. C. 

RENATE GUTTMAN 

John Umstead Hospital 

Butner, N. C. 

ADRIANA HALL 

Dorothea Dix Hospital 

Raleigh, N. C. 



♦Field instructors for the Spring Term, 1972, may include others not listed. 



The School of Social Work 



11 



PATRICIA HALL 

Veterans Administration Hospital 

Durham, N. C. 

LELA MOORE HALL 

New Hanover Co. Dept. of Social 

Services 
Wilmington, N. C. 
JEAN HARNED 
N. C. Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
VIRGINIA HEBBERT 
N. C. Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
BETTY HEDGEPETH 
John Umstead Hospital 
Butner, N. C. 
KENNETH HICKS 
Dorothea Dix Hospital 
Raleigh, N. C. 
JOAN HOLLAND 
Family & Children's Services 
State Dept. of Social Services 
Raleigh, N. C. 
BARBARA HORNE 
Housing Authority 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
RONALD M. HUFFMAN 
Bladen Co. Dept. of Social Services 
Elizabethtown, N. C. 
EDGAR P. ISRAEL 

Haywood Co. Dept. of Social Services 

Waynesville, N. C. 

ALLAN JARRATT 

Baptist Children's Homes of N. C. 

Asheville, N. C. 

ANN JOHNSON 

Coordinating Council for Senior 

Citizens 
Durham, N. C. 
EDITH KANE 
Dorothea Dix Hospital 
Raleigh, N. C. 
DOROTHY Kl ESTER 
Institute of Government 
UNC Campus 
JAMES KIRKPATRICK 
State Dept. of Social Services 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOSEPH KLUG 
United Community Fund 
Charlotte, N. C. 
RONALD KNOPF 

New Hanover Dept. of Social Services 

Wilmington, N. C. 

BING LAU 

Murdoch Center 

Butner, N. C. 

JAMES LAWSON 

McDowell Co. Dept. of Social Services 
Marion, N. C. 
CLAUDELINE LEWIS 
N. C. Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
WILLIAM LOFQUIST 
Youth Services Bureau 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

VIRGINIA LONG 
Out-Patient Psychiatry 
N. C. Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

EDGAR MACKIE 
Dorothea Dix Hospital 
Raleigh, N. C. 

DENNIS MARCINKO 
Dorothea Dix Hospital 
Raleigh, N. C. 

BLAN MINTON 

N. C. Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

ROBERT MOORE 
Murdoch Center 
Butner, N. C. 

CATHERINE MULBEY 
Dorothea Dix Hospital 
Raleigh, N. C. 

QUIN MURRAY 

State Dept. of Mental Health 

Raleigh, N. C. 

EDWARD NADELMAN 
Family & Children's Services 
Charlotte, N. C. 

BETTY NEAL 

Youth Services Bureau 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



12 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



PATRICIA NEWMAN 

W. H. Trentman Mental Health Center 

Raleigh, N. C. 

MARY ANN NICHOLSON 

N. C. Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

H. LEON NORMAN 

Watauga Co. Dept. of Social Services 
Boone, N. C. 

CARROLL GROVER NORWOOD 
Alcoholic Rehabilitation Center 
Black Mountain, N. C. 
EMELYN PETHOL 
Greensboro Public Schools 
Headstart Program 
Greensboro, N. C. 
JOANN PICKETT 
John Umstead Hospital 
Butner, N. C. 
ALICE PIERCE 
Family Service-Traveler's Aid 
Raleigh, N. C. 
ELLEN PIETZ 

Guilford Co. Mental Health Center 

Greensboro, N. C. 

AFTON QUINN 

Methodist Home for Children 

Raleigh, N. C. 

HILDA P. RAMSEY 

Buncombe Co. Dept. of Social Services 

Asheville, N. C. 

VIRGINIA RIGGSBEE 

N. C. Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

RALPH ROBINSON 

Elon Children's Home 

Elon, N. C. 

JOHN B. ROWELL 

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Co. Mental 

Health Clinic 
Charlotte, N. C. 



JAMES SCHERER 

United Community Services 

Greensboro, N. C. 

LOUISE SEYMOUR 

Veterans Administration Hospital 

Durham, N. C. 

BETH SHUBERT 

Durham Rehabilitation Center 

Durham, N. C. 

KATHLEEN SMITH 

Dorothea Dix Hospital 

Raleigh, N. C. 

CARL STALEY 

United Day Care Center 

Greensboro, N. C. 

HAROLD STEPHENS 

Juvenile Evaluation Center 

Swannanoa, N. C. 

H. B. THOMAS 

Pender Co. Dept. of Social Services 
Burgaw, N. C. 
PATRICK THOMAS 
E.P.O. 

Durham, N. C. 

FRED THOMPSON 
Myrtle Underwood School 
Raleigh, N. C. 

CAROLYN THORNTON 

Lincoln Hospital Community Center 

Durham, N. C. 

CARL VINES 
Dept. of Social Services 
Model Cities Program 
High Point, N. C. 

MARIAN WHISNANT 
Children's Home Society 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

JOAN WYATT 

John Umstead Hospital 

Butner, N. C. 



Co-operating Agency Supervisors in Field Instruction Program 

MRS. GERALD BUCHANAN RUBY M. BYERS 

Parkwood Day Care Center Housing Authority 

Durham, N. C. City of Greensboro 

Greensboro, N. C. 



The School of Social Work 



13 



GERALDINE CALLOWAY 

Family & Children's Services 

Wake Co. Dept. of Social Services 

Raleigh, N. C. 

PATRICIA CUNNINGHAM 

Milbrook Middle School 

Raleigh, N. C. 

BETTY DOM AN 

Wake Co. Health Dept. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

NANCY DREW 

Millbrook High School 

Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHN HAMILTON 

Juvenile Court 

10th Judicial District 

Raleigh, N. C. 

MIKE HENNIKE 

HCEEA Program 

Lincoln School Annex 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

FRANK INGRAM 

W. H. Trentman Mental Health Center 
Raleigh, N. C. 



RUTH MIAL 

Urban Redevelopment 

Raleigh, N. C. 

ANN MILLER 

East Garner Jr. High School 
Garner, N. C. 

NICHOLAS PEDIADITAKIS 

W. H. Trentman Mental Health Center 

Raleigh, N. C. 

JAMES PENLEY 
Asheville City Schools 
South French Broad School 
Asheville, N. C. 

MAUDE REESE 
Cary School 
Cary, N. C. 

FRANK SULLIVAN 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Wake Co. Dept. of Public Instruction 

Raleigh, N. C. 

MARIE WALL 

Wake Co. Health Dept. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



14 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

The University of North Carolina, provided for in the state constitution in 
1776 and chartered in 1789, laid the cornerstone of its first building in 1793 
and opened its doors to students in 1795. It thereby became the first state 
university in the United States to admit students and send them out into the 
nation bearing a state university diploma. 

The Graduate School was established in 1903 and was reorganized in 1920. 
At that time the University was elected to membership in the Association of 
American Universities. 

The School of Public Welfare was established in conjunction with the 
Department of Sociology in 1920 and later became the Division of Social Work 
and Public Welfare in the Graduate School. Master's degrees were first awarded 
in 1920. The Division was accredited by the Ccuncil on Social Work Education 
in 1929. The Division of Social Work and Public Welfare became the School 
of Social Work on September 1, 1950 and continues to be an accredited 
member of the Council on Social Work Education. 

At present the School awards the Master of Social Work degree and offers 
other special institutes. Plans are under way for a doctoral program. 

The current enrollment of the School is limited to 160 full-time students. 

Curriculum 

The School of Social Work offers an individualized flexible program of 
study, leading to the Master of Social Work degree, designed to prepare the 
student for social work tasks in a variety of fields of social endeavor. 

For students entering the field without a substantial background of aca- 
demic preparation the curriculum consists of a core of courses designed to 
orient the student to the problems, methods and theoretical underpinnings of 
the profession, offered in the Fall semester, and then a course of study, 
normally comprising three semesters, in one of the concentrations described 
below. Each concentration normally requires both classroom instruction and 
a series of practica designed to test out theory in practice. All students are 
required to take Social Work 300, Studies in Social Work Process. Options and 
electives may be taken, in accordance with the student's educational plan, in 
other schools or departments. 

Students who have substantial undergraduate preparation for social work, 
or graduate study in social work or in a related discipline may be admitted 
with advanced status and in some cases complete their work in less than four 
semesters. 

Concentration in Management and Development 
of Human Service Resources (M eta systems) 

Increasingly, graduate trained social workers are taking on managerial 
and developmental functions within an expanding field of human services. 
The focus of this concentration is on the management and development of 
human service resources. Management involves organizing, planning, directing, 
and supervising human service enterprises. Development involves the stimu- 
lation, mobilization and preparation of conditions and talents for effective 



The School of Social Work 



15 



human service activity. Human service resources include organizations, associ- 
ations, and personnel, which contribute to the social welfare of a population. 

Within this general focus of study, students may elect to pursue indi- 
vidualized study programs leading to administration, social welfare planning, 
training and development, or a combination thereof. Upon completion of the 
concentration all students are expected to demonstrate beginning proficiency 
in planning, organizing, directing and controlling. 

Students in this concentration take, beyond the core curriculum, from 
9 to 15 hours in a project-type practicum involving tutorial supervision or 
consultation from a faculty member, and from seven to eleven courses within 
or outside the School in accordance with the student's educational plan with 
the provision that there must be emphasis in one or more courses on each of 
the following areas of knowledge. 

(a) Organization theories 

(b) Administrative behavior or management skill 

(c) The social, cultural, political or economic milieu and/or problems 

(d) Human service resource development and use 

Acquaintance with basic theory in microsystems and/or macrosystems is 
desirable, but no specific course requirement is made. 

Other courses may be concentrated in a particular area of theory or prac- 
tice or may be directed to more of a general ist approach. 

Concentration in Services to 

Communities and Institutional Systems (Macrosystems) 

The concentration in community social work is directed to developing 
knowledge and skills necessary to practice social work in relation to com- 
munity problems and needs and their resolution through societal programs for 
change and improved delivery of social services. The instructional program is 
geared to the utilization of a variety of techniques and modes of practice in 
working with groups, communities and institutional systems. There are two 
major emphases in the concentration: 1) basic or generic social work values, 
knowledge and practice skills involved in grass roots organizing, community 
development, social action, problem-solving and planning, program design and 
implementation; and 2) particular knowledge and expertise in respect to 
specific intervention through such change systems as client groups, planning 
councils, community action programs, manpower services, housing and urban 
development and others. 

Students in this concentration are required to take the core curriculum, 
three practica in community practice (when indicated, electives may be sub- 
stituted by one of these practica), the foundations course, Social Work 250, 
a specialized course in organizing methods, a specialized course in social 
planning, four elective courses of which two should be "breadth" options 
concerned with broad social welfare problems and Social Work 300, Studies 
in Social Work Practice. 

Concentration in Services to Individuals, 
Families and Small Groups (Microsystems) 

The focus of study in the concentration is the configuration of client 
systems, social problems and social services. Its aim is that the student 



16 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



acquire a knowledge base appropriate to a systematic engagement of these 
elements in formulating and carrying out service strategies which enhance 
the social functioning of individuals, families and small groups. 

A range of helping models is analyzed in light of the contributions of the 
behavioral and social sciences and the values of society and the social work 
profession. Social work tasks and roles, settings and fields of service are 
examined in terms of their relevance to existing client systems and social 
problems. 

Building upon the School's core curriculum, emphasis is placed on the 
students acquiring a rationale for differential use of problem assessing, plan- i 
ning, programming, and evaluative approaches. Beyond concentration require- 
ments, students may select from University offerings courses directed toward 
acquiring knowledge and skills in specialized fields of service. 

Students in this concentration are required to take the core curriculum, 
the basic course, Social Work 225, three practica, three "depth" options con- 
cerned directly with practice, two "breadth" options concerned with broad i 
social welfare problems, one elective which may be either "breadth" or "depth" 
or be in some other field, and Social Work 300, Studies in Social Work Practice. 

Field Instruction 

Field Instruction provides a student with experience and practice oppor- 
tunities in human services related to his chosen concentration of study. These i 
experiences cut across social agency department and service bourdaries. The 
field learning environment permits each student to practice social work skills 
and to gain a comprehensive understanding of a field of social work service 1 
or a social problem. Through observation, practice, special assignments and 
seminars opportunities are utilized to enable students to have some direct 
engagement with the continuum of a given field of service or a selected social 
problem. A diversification of experience enables students to learn about 
working with client systems, social welfare systems, community systems and 
human services systems. Students participate in selection of learning areas. 

Field Instruction settings include: family and children services, school 
social services, medical social services, in-patient and out-patient mental' 
health services, correctional social services, social planning agencies, com- 
munity action programs, community development and neighborhood organi-i 
zation programs, manpower development program and housing programs. 

Work-Study Programs 

The School maintains work-study programs at four university campuses 
in the State— at Asheville, Charlotte, Greenville, and Wilmington. Students in 
work-study programs must be employed in some form of social service andi 
must be granted released time by their agencies for study. They attend classes 
one day a week and in two of the four semesters which cover the work done 
in two semesters at Chapel Hill are also engaged in practica in their own -oi,| 
another agency which may require an additional one or two days a week. 

Work-Study students are admitted by the same criteria as full-time stuj 
dent, follow the same curriculum and are judged by the same standards. / 



The School of Social Work 



17 



student successfully completing one or two years of work-study is eligible 
to continue work at Chapel Hill. 

Work-Study applicants are accepted to begin their work only in odd- 
numbered years. 

Group Child Care Consultant Services 

The School of Social Work provides, in cooperation with the Southeastern 
Child Care Association, a service offering consultation, study and evaluation, 
research, and training to approximately eighty child care agencies in twenty- 
one states. 

The service, founded in 1956, is by request or on a continuing member- 
ship basis. Small agencies in North and South Carolina are assisted by The 
Duke Endowment to obtain the service at a fraction of its cost. 

In addition to on-the-site work with its members, the Consultant Services 
offers: conferences for child care workers, executives and other staff of child 
care institutions each July, "The Chapel Hill Workshops" (founded in 1945); 
"The Winter Seminar for Social Workers" (founded in 1970); and a Certificate 
Training Program for Child Care Workers, Supervisors of Child Care Workers, 
Administrators and Social Workers during the summer. Courses for prac- 
titioners are also held during the school year. For information write to the 
Executive Director, Group Child Care Consultant Services, 204 Henderson 
Street, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27514. 

The Community Action Training Center 

The Community Action Training Center is concerned with training and 
research related to the development and implementation of local and state 
community action programs that deal with social problems and community 
needs. The Center provides assessments of the training needs in such pro- 
grams, develop curriculum materials and training approaches for working with 
community action programs and indigenous community groups, and offers 
direct training services. At the present time the Center's research interests 
are directed towards encouraging and initiating study and research cn the 
problems and conditions that effect North Carolina residents living in con- 
ditions below national standards for income housing, social services, health 
care, educational and employment opportunity. 

The School of Social Work's community action training activities were 
initiated in 1966 with establishment of the Community Action Training Unit. 
These activities were in 1969 extended to provide broader services to North 
Carolina communities with the transfer to the School of Social Work of the 
community action training responsibilities formerly carried out in the Univer- 
sity by the University Extension Division. 



18 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



ADMISSIONS 

Steps Prior to Admission 

1. Applicants who wish to be considered for admission should request the 
required application blanks from the Director of Admissions. All applicants 
are required to pay a $10.00 non-deductible, non-refundable application fee. 
An Applicant who has been offered admission reserves his place by the 
payment of a $100.00 non-refundable deposit which is credited toward the 
first semester's tuition. Because of the increasing number of applicants, it 
is best to submit applications by January fcr the Fall Semester. The 
School's two-year master of social work program begins only in the Fall 
Semester. 

2. Students wishing to be considered for advanced standing should apply to 
such standing as early as possible. A student permitted advanced standing 
that exempts him from the core curriculum may sometimes be admitted 
in January. Applicants who have completed successfully the first year of 
graduate study at an accredited School of Social Work and meet the 
admission requirements of the Graduate School may be admitted directly 
to the second year program. 

3. Students wishing to work out a decelerated program should indicate this 
as soon as possible in the admission process. 

The Admissions Committee of the School of Social Work reviews each 
application and recommends admission to the Graduate School of the 
University which makes the final decision on admissions. The admissions 
process takes from six weeks to two months depending on the receipt of 
complete application material. 

Admission Requirements 

Because professional social work competence requires more than scholas- 
tic ability on the part of the graduate, the Admissions Committee is concerned 
with the overall capacity of the applicant to achieve professional competency 
as a result of his education. Interest in social work, motivation to help others, 
capacity to relate to others and the degree of personal maturity are factors 
which are considered in respect to evaluating the following minimum require- 
ments: 

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. 

2. Undergraduate courses must have included at least eighteen semester 
hours in anthropology, economics, sociology, political science or psychology. 
It is recommended that there be a distribution of courses in two or more 
of these fields. The student deficient in these requirements may be required 
to take courses outside the School to be eligible for admission to candi- 
dacy for a degree. 

3. A grade point average of 3.0. Occasionally exceptions are made below 3.0, 
but not lower than 2.5. 

4. Academic and work references. 

5. Score on the Miller Analogies Test prior to admission if the grade point 
average is below 3.0. 

6. A personal interview may be required. 



The School of Social Work 



19 



7. Competency in speaking and writing English and ability to present material 
in an orderly, clear and logical way. A special English class is offered for 
students if necessary to meet this requirement. 

Scholarships — Stipends — Loans 

Scholarships 

Applicants who need full or part scholarships or loans should note this in 
the supplementary application statement. After admission to the School the 
Scholarship Committee will assist the applicant to plan for necessary financial 
assistance. 

Federal Scholarships 

Under the provisions of the National Mental Health Act, a limited number 
of traineeships are available for the training of students in psychiatric social 
work, corrections, and school social work. 

While there is no work commitment to a specific agency after graduation, 
there is a moral commitment to work in the area of the specific scholarship. 
At least one year of field placement will be in a psychiatric, school social work, 
or corrections setting. 

The Babcock Foundation has provided four scholarships for 1971-72 stu- 
dents from minority groups. They are administered by the School. 

Several social agencies award scholarships to social work students which 
carry a commitment to work a year after graduation for each year the scholar- 
ship was received. A list of North Carolina agencies which have scholarships 
will be sent upon request. 

The National Urban League has a scholarship program for students inter- 
ested in community social work. Application should be made by writing the 
Urban League, 55 East 52nd Street, New York, N. Y. 10022. 

The Council on Social Work Education, 345 East 46th Street, New York, 
N. Y. 10017, publishes a yearly "Student Financial Aid for Master's Program in 
Graduate Schools of Social Work in the U.S.A. and Canada." The cost is $1.50. 

Loan Funds 

The North Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation of Raleigh, North 
Carolina, has set apart $25,000 as a loan fund for social work students. Money 
may be borrowed at 4 per cent interest and may be repaid on easy terms as 
sixty monthly installments beginning one year after the student finishes his 
period of study. Repayments are applied first to accrued interest and then to 
principal. Collateral security or two responsible endorsers are required. Appli- 
cations should be made through the School of Social Work or direct to the 
Corporation office in Raleigh. 

The Emanuel Sternberger Education Fund has resources available on a 
non-interest bearing loan basis for citizens or residents of the State of North 
Carolina. Inquiry may be made directly to Mr. Sidney J. Stern, Jr., Emanuel 
Sternberger Educational Fund, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

In addition to these special loan funds, the general loan funds, announced 
in the University catalogue, are open to graduate students. Applications 
approved by the Dean of the School of Social Work, should be made to the 
Office of the Director of Student Aid. 



20 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Annie Kizer Bost Award in the Public Social Services 

Each year an award will be made to a graduating student in the School of 
Social Work in memory of Mrs. Annie Kizer Bost. Mrs. Bost was Commissioner 
of Public Welfare in North Carolina from 1930 to 1944. The award is made to a 
North Carolina resident who intends to work in the broad field of public welfare 
in the State. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

For the degree of Master of Social Work the student must complete or be 
exempted from the core curriculum and the requirements of one of the three 
concentrations, including Social Work 300 (Study in Social Work Practice). 
All students must complete at least 30 hours of course work in residence. 
Work taken in the School's work-study program is deemed to have been taken 
in residence. 

Formal application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree is 
required. This is generally made during the second year of study. Approval of 
the application is dependent on the previous work of the student as shown by 
his undergraduate record; the score on the Miller Analogies Test; the record 
made in the Graduate School prior to the time when the application is filed; 
the certification, by the School cf Social Work, that the student is qualified 
to continue advanced work with a program of work prepared in satisfaction of 
the requirements for the degree; and the removal of any special conditions 
imposed by the School of Social Work or by the Administrative Board of the 
Graduate School. 

The student is expected to obtain a grade of P or better in all of his 
courses. A grade of F, or a grade of L in three courses, or in nine hours of 
courses will terminate the student's progress toward the degree or toward 
completion of the year of training. A student who is admitted provisionally 
by the Graduate School may have more stringent conditions placed on his 
continuing in school. 

Only work announced as open for graduate credit in this bulletin or the 
bulletin of the Summer Session may be counted toward higher degrees. 

Work taken moie than five years before the date at which the master's 
degree is expected may not be used to count for credit toward that degree, 
except that this rule may be waived in regard to courses closely related to 
social work practice when the candidate has been actively engaged in social 
work involving the application of such courses. 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the School of Social Work the 
requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is generally waived 
in the case of a candidate for the degree of Master of Social Work. 

Notice is called to the regulation of the Graduate School that work taken 
while the student is enrolled as a "special student" may not be credited later 
as a part of the fulfillment of the requirements for a graduate degree. 

Examinations 

Candidates for the master's degree are required to pass all examinations 
in courses at the end of each semester of residence with the grade specified 
under the general regulations given above. In addition, a written examination 



The School of Social Work 



21 



on the field of the major is set by the student's advisory committee and must 
be taken no earlier than the first month of the last semester of residence. 

In the School of Social Work this takes the form of a comprehensive 
examination given in April or May of the second year. 

Examinations in course and the final written examination must satisfy 
the committee which has charge of them that the candidate possesses such 
knowledge of the theory of social work as may reasonably be expected, that 
he can draw upon his knowledge with promptness and accuracy, and that his 
thinking is not limited to the separate units represented by his courses. 

The recommendation of the faculty of the School of Social Work will be 
reported to the Dean of the Graduate School at least one week before the end 
of the last semester of residence. If the candidate's record is satisfactory, 
and if he has complied with all the requirements for the degree, the Dean 
will report the student to the University faculty for approval and recommen- 
dation to the Board of Trustees. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

The University reserves the right to make, with the approval of the proper 
authorities, changes in tuition and any other fees at any time. 

For in-state students the University fees for an academic year, including 
the $150.00 field work fee, are approximately $550. For out-of-state students 
these fees, including the $150.00 field work fee, will amount to approximately 
$2130. 

Housing 

The University provides housing for unmarried students in residence 
halls, several of which are reserved for graduate students. The cost per aca- 
demic year is $330-$650. Laundry and linen services are available at reasonable 
rates. Further information about housing may be found in the Graduate School 
Catalog. Dining facilities are operated in locations convenient to resident halls 
and meals are offered at reasonable rates. 

The University has several hundred apartments available for married stu- 
dents, consisting of one bedroom and two bedroom units. Rent is approxi- 
mately $82 to $110.00 per month, while rent in the older pre-fabricated units 
is considerably lower. It is a general policy of the University to grant priority 
to married graduate students. Early application to the Director of Residence 
Life is strongly recommended. 

Apart from University housing, there are privately operated residence halls 
in University Square. These buildings have a cafeteria dining commons, and 
the fee charged includes room and board. Arrangements for these accommo- 
dations should be made directly with the Granville Towers Business Office, 
(University Square, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. 

Student Health Service 

In order to provide proper medical attention for the student, the Univer- 
sity employs nine full-time physicians, two part-time physicians, two half-time 
osychiatrists, one part-time consulting psychologist, and one half-time marriage 
counselor, who provide general medical care and psychiatric counseling. It 
<naintains a well-appointed infirmary with sixty-five beds. Modern diagnostic 



22 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



facilities include an x-ray unit, under the direction of a full-time technician, 
and a clinical laboratory, under the direction of two full-time technicians. The 
infirmary is under the immediate supervision of the Director of Student Health 
Service and is provided with seventeen full-time experienced nurses who are 
directed by a nursing supervisor. At the discretion of the attending physician, 
a student may be admitted to the wards, and for such services as may be 
rendered by the staff no charges are made. However, certain highly specialized 
services (major surgery, consultations, certain types of x-ray and laboratory 
procedures) not available at the infirmary are rendered by N. C. Memorial 
Hospital at standard charges. In addition, a charge is made for inpatient 
meals and for other than routine drugs and dressings provided on either an 
inpatient or outpatient basis. Charges are also made for routine procedures 
not directly related to the health of a student — such as pre-employment 
physical examinations, and the like — and for services rendered between regu- 
lar sessions when the student is not actually enrolled in the University. 



i 



The School of Social Work 



23 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses listed from departments other than Social Work and occasionally 
a course not listed, may be elected for credit with the approval of the stu- 
dent's special committee or of the Dean. 

Subject to restrictions of the Graduate School (see Graduate Catalogue), 
with the approval of the head of the major department and of the Dean, stu- 
dents in other departments of the University may elect courses in the School 
of Social Work. Such students will be given credit as a part of their program 
approved by the major department, not in the School of Social Work. This 
rule will not prevent the transfer of credit in accord with the regulations of 
the University if the student later registers with the School. 

The listing of a course in the catalogue does not obligate the University 
to give the course in any particular year. 

Course for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

105 DISORDERS OF DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING IN 

CHILDHOOD (Psychology 105, Maternal and Child Health 105) 2 Hours 

Interdisciplinary approach to developmental problems in children. Over- 
view of etiological factors, diagnostic and management techniques. 
Lecture and discussion. Individual and group projects. 

Courses for Graduates 

200 PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL 
ENVIRONMENT 3 Hours 

Examination of selected perspectives and theories about the nature of 
man and society with focus on the assumptions underlying these per- 
spectives and the implication of each for an understanding of social 
functioning and social work practice. 

201 FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL WELFARE AND SOCIAL WORK 3 Hours 

An investigation of the socio-cultural, economic and political factors 
which inflrence both the understanding of social issues and the evolu- 
tion of the professional response, using the historical method as an 
analytic tool. 

202 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS 3 Hours 

An overview of the assumptions underlying scientific methods and the 
applicability of various research designs in either developing knowledge 
relative to some problem area or in assessing the results of various 
intervention strategies applied by social workers. 

204 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM I 3 Hours 

This Practicum includes observation, field study, seminars and simu- 
lated practice. It provides the student opportunity to learn beginning 
practice skills and to identify and critically appraise the social worker's 
operational activities within the context of organizations and systems 
designed to meet human need. All day Tuesday and Thursday. Special 
fee: $75.00 per semester. 



24 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



205 HUMAN VALUES AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3 Hours 

A consideration of the nature of human values, personal and professional, 
as a factor in shaping human behavior and in the definition and selection 
of approaches toward the resolution of social problems. 

210 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL WORK 3 Hours 

The course traces the development of helping method from its Greek, 
Hebrew and Latin roots to the modern day, with special attention to the 
effects of culture, philosophy and theology on helping theory. The process 
is related to similar and different processes in administration, art, 
literature, religion and the practice of other professions. Class dis- 
cussion, reading, and a term paper. 

221 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM II 3 Hours 

Prerequisite, completion of Practicum I. In this Practicum the student 
becomes directly engaged in the providing of professional services. He 
is involved in translating theory into practice and learning practice skills 
appropriate to the learning objectives of his chosen concentration. All 
day Tuesday and Thursday. Special fee: $75.00 per semester. 

222 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM III 6 Hours 

This Practicum provides students with the opportunity to further develop 
practice skills in the area of this concentration and provides oppor- 
tunity to further their knowledge and understanding of program develop- 
ment, planning, analysis and implementation. All day Monday, Wednes- 
day and Friday. Special fee: S75.00 per semester. 

223 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM IV 6 Hours 

This Practicum offers the student in depth devolopment, integration and 
reinforcement of competence through performance in specially selected 
service situations. Students admitted to course by permission. All day 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Special fee: $75.00 per semester. 

224 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM V Var. 

An individualized, tutoria I ly-oriented unit of study and action consisting 
of a time-limited set of related social work tasks which leads to the 
development of a specific professional product. Special fee: $75.00 per 
semester. 

226 SOCIAL WORK SERVICES TO FAMILIES 3 Hours 

The family as the unit of social work treatment. Stress is placed on 
patterns of family communication and interaction. Lectures, tapes, dis- 
cussions and student presentations. 

227 SOCIAL WORK SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS 3 Hours 

The helping process in working with individuals. Selected theories are 
applied to the differential assessment, goal setting, and interventive 
strategies related to a variety of problems of increasing complexity. 

228 SOCIAL WORK WITH GROUPS 3 Hours 

Advanced treatment of several theories of social group work and of 
models of work with groups used by other professions. Application of 
material to students' current field practice experiences. 



The School of Social Work 



25 



229 PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS OF AGENCY CHILD CARE 3 Hours 

An examination of process, structure and principles involved in caring 
for children away from their own homes, or where separation from home 
is in question. Foster family, group and part-time care, placement for 
adoption, counseling and protective services. Readings, papers, and class 
discussion. 

230 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR 3 Hours 

Lectures and clinical demonstrations on the dynamics of development 
and of normal behavior, with emphasis on unconscious motivations and 
mechanisms. For practical purposes differentiation is made between 
essentially normal responses and those significant in psychoneuroses, 
psychopathic personality and psychoses, but similarities will also be 
noted. The course will include such reference to treatment methods. 
Collateral reading will also be assigned. 

231 PERSPECTIVES ON THE FAMILY 3 Hours 

Description and analyses of the family viewed as a social system and 
as a societal institution and appropriate theory and research. Problems 
of particular interest to social work practitioners are stressed. 

232 SMALL GROUP THEORY 2 Hours 

Selected concepts from small group theory as a basis for social work 
practice. 

240 SUICIDOLOGY AND CRISIS INTERVENTION 3 Hours 

Suicide and self-destructive behavior within the context of cultural 
attitudes towards death and psychosocial environments. Historical, 
philosophical, and legal perspectives; epidemiologic and demographic 
variables; theory and dynamics; clinical management and research. 

242 APPLICATION OF SOCIO-BEHAVIORAL TECHNIQUES 

TO SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 3 Hours 

An examination of socio-behavioral techniques appropriate for appli- 
cation to social work practice. Readings, papers and discussion will be 
specifically related to each student's field experience. 

243 MARRIAGE COUNSELING 3 Hours 

A clinical seminar which analyzes the operations and character of 
marriage counseling as a human service technique. 

244 MENTAL RETARDATION AND SOCIAL WORK 3 Hours 

Mental retardation is examined as an individual and social problem 
from various perspectives: definition, epidemiology, historical trends, 
behavioral functioning, impact on family, community, and the role of 
social work in service delivery. 

250 THEORETICAL BASES FOR SERVICES TO LARGER GROUPS, 

COMMUNITIES, AND INSTITUTIONAL SYSTEMS 3 Hours 

A variety of concepts of community and its functioning are reviewed, 
the major principles on which community work is based are examined, 
and the knowledge required to participate effectively as a professional in 
community planning and problem-solving are identified. 



26 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



251 CITIZEN PARTICIPATION AND GRASS ROOTS ORGANIZATION 3 Hours 

The role of the social worker in facilitating citizen participation and in 
the development of grass roots organizations for problem-solving, and 
community improvement are analyzed and methods for practice identi- 
fied. 

252 PLANNING AND COORDINATING FOR PROBLEM 

SOLVING AND SERVICE DELIVERY 3 Hours 

Review of agencies engaged in planning, coordinating, and inter- 
organizational functions. Examination of theories, perspectives and 
procedures in social planning. Identification of knowledge and skills 
necessary to problem solution. 

275 DESIGN, MANAGEMENT, AND EVALUATION 

OF ORGANIZATIONS 3 Hours 

A review of forces and aspirations which create formal organizations, 
the functions and dysfunctions of such organizations, and the processes 
evolved to cope with inter- and intra-organizational conflicts. 

276 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF SUPERVISION 3 Hours 

Various approaches to and practice of supervision within an organi- 
zational development context. Emphasis on the task of the supervisor 
in service planning, management and resource development. 

277 HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT 3 Hours 

Issues, approaches and trends in human resource development as an 
organized activity involving preparing persons to function in a specific 
system, directed towards individuals or towards those systems in which 
individuals are expected to participate. 

285 ANALYSIS OF INCOME MAINTENANCE SYSTEMS 3 Hours 

This course examines programs for economic security, including national 
employment policies, fiscal policies, and income maintenance programs. 
Emphasis is placed on the problem identification and formulation phase 
of policy making. Criteria are developed by which the student learns to 
analyze policies and programs with respect to effectiveness and effi- 
ciency. Income maintenance programs in other nations are examined. 

286 ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL SERVICE SYSTEMS 3 Hours 

Prerequisite, second-year standing. This course examines the various 
systems into which social services are organized and by which they are »] 
delivered. Using the criteria developed for income security programs 
in S.W. 285 students will analyze the organization of social services 
with special reference to problems in the delivery of the services to 
varying population groups. Economic, social, professional, and racial 
barriers to service delivery will ie examined as will the problems related 
to effective planning of service systems. 

287 SOCIAL WORK AND THE LAW 3 Hours 

Seminar on law as a resource in social work practice, with emphasis on 
areas where the two professions frequently meet, i.e., public welfare, 
juvenile court, family law, adoptions, etc. Examines attitudes of law and 
social work toward each other, development and complexity of law, basic 
constitutional principles as applied to socio-legal institutions, the 



The School of Social Work 



27 



adversary process as a method of seeking truth, role of courts and the 
attorney, similarities and differences in the two professions. 

SOCIAL WORK ADMINISTRATION 3 Hours 

Problems and principles in the administration of a social agency. Read- 
ings, class reports, and discussion. 

LEGISLATIVE PROCESS IN SOCIAL WELFARE 3 Hours 

State and national legislative processes on selected social welfare issues 
illustrative of ways in which social policies are made and their con- 
sequences, both intended and unintended, on programs and populations. 

SEMINAR: STUDIES IN SOCIAL WORK PROCESS 3 Hours 

Successful completion of a substantial study, professional in content 
and in its manner of presentation, in which the student examines some 
problem or area of practice in which he has been engaged and supports 
his findings with evidence from his own learning, experience, and 
practice. 

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED PRACTICE 3 Hours 

Open to professional social workers with M.S.W., or comparable degree, 
or by special arrangement. This course focuses on the changing strategies 
of social work intervention in relation to social problems and various 
client systems. 

SEMINAR IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND 



THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT 



3 Hours Each 



SEMINAR IN SOCIAL POLICY 



3 Hours Each 



SEMINAR IN SOCIAL RESEARCH 



3 Hours Each 



SEMINAR IN SERVICES TO 
INDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES AND 
SMALL GROUPS 

SEMINAR IN SERVICES TO LARGER 
GROUPS, COMMUNITIES AND 
INSTITUTIONAL SYSTEMS 

SEMINAR IN ADMINISTRATION AND 
PLANNING IN SOCIAL WELFARE 



3 Hours Each 

3 Hours Each 
3 Hours Each 



78 SEMINAR IN SOCIAL WORK SUPERVISION 3 Hours 

Prerequisite, master's degree in social work. A course designed for 
supervisors who are practicing supervision in their agencies, to learn the 
teaching of social work knowledge and skills to the beginning or less 
experienced worker through the supervisory relationship within the social 
agency. 



•0 GENERAL REGISTRATION 



Hours 



28 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 



Second-Year Students 




Student 


State of Residence 


Alston, Mrs. Gail Owens 


North Carolina 


Alvarez, Mrs. Edith 


North Carolina 


Bailey, Mrs. Jane W. 


North Carolina 


Baney, Miss Marjorie 


Pennsylvania 


Bardin, Miss Joan Lucille 


North Carolina 


Bartlett, Mrs. Nancy S. 


North Carolina 


Bartley, Miss Mildred Renee 


North Carolina 


Bass, Miss Mary Catherine 


North Carolina 


Best, Miss Diane Patricia 


North Carolina 


Blanks, Mrs. Delilah B. 


North Carolina 


Boylin, Mrs. Margaret Wilson 


North Carolina 


Byrd, Arthur W., Jr. 


North Carolina 


Caldwell, Miss Julie 


North Carolina 


Carr, Almon F. 


North Carolina 


Cash, Curtis Ambrose 


North Carolina 


Cash, Mrs. Melanie A. 


New Hampshire 


Chu, Peter Pong 


North Carolina 


Clerici, Miss Sue 


North Carolina 


Coats, James 


North Carolina 


Conner, Francis Pickens 


North Carolina 


Danforth, Miss Marie Lynn 


Massachusetts 


Davis, Wayne 


North Carolina 


Day, Doel David 


Georgia 


DeMaine, Mrs. Ann Wuehrmann 


Alabama 


Dick, Jimmy Delane 


North Carolina 


Dove, Melvin 


Virginia 


Dutton, Miss Martha Jean 


North Carolina 


Evans, Mrs. Delores Benton 


North Carolina 


Fay, Mrs. Nancy Craig 


North Carolina 


Finch, Charles Franklin 


North Carolina 


Goglia, Miss Linda Rose 


Virginia 


Green, Mrs. Gloria Snipes 


North Carolina 


Greenlaw, Alton W. 


North Carolina 


Guth, Mrs. Patricia Ann Trotter 


North Carolina 


Hauser, Michael Francis 


North Carolina 


High, William Wilson 


North Carolina 


Hoffman, Phillip D. 


North Carolina 


Hooper, Mrs. Pamela Coughlan 


Georgia 


Hopkins, James W., Jr. 


North Carolina 


Huff, Miss Metta Jean 


South Carolina 


Jones, Rome E. 


North Carolina 


Kaylor, Miss Janet Catherine 


Mississippi 


Keith-Lucas, Mrs. Margaret Hargreaves 


North Carolina 


Kornegay, Samuel 


North Carolina 



The School of Social Work 



29 



Student 


State of Residence 


Krimminger, Miss Betty L. 


North Carolina 


Landes, Henry Derstine 


Pennsylvania 


Lee, Ken Yan-Jen 


Taiwan 


Levy, Miss Linda Jane 


North Carolina 


Linford, Ted 


North Carolina 


McCall, Jerry Lynn 


Kansas 


McClearen, Mrs. Ellen R. Warren 


Virginia 


McColl, Robert Lee 


North Carolina 


McNeill, Mrs. Catherine D. 


North Carolina 


Martin, Mrs. Gloria Howard 


North Carolina 


Michael, Gary Edward 


North Carolina 


Moore, Miss Mary Elizabeth 


North Carolina 


Morris, Franklin W. 


North Carolina 


Musick, Mrs. Dora Dixon 


North Carolina 


Newlin, Mrs. Jill Silverstein 


North Carolina 


Niblack, Mrs. Deanna K. 


North Carolina 


Noel, Mrs. Sarah George 


North Carolina 


Norris, David Archie 


North Carolina 


Opper, Mrs. Roberta Leinwand 


North Carolina 


Overby, Mrs. Patricia Croy 


North Carolina 


Pace, Miss Marilyn C. 


Alabama 


Peacock, Mrs. Robin Lear 


North Carolina 


Quin, Mrs. Harriott Johnson 


North Carolina 


Quinn, Mrs. Susan Proctor 


North Carolina 


Raben, Mrs. Freida 


North Carolina 


Ray, Miss Susan Ann 


North Carolina 


Roberson, Donald G. 


North Carolina 


Rogers, Carl T. 


North Carolina 


Ruiz, Mrs. Ana Laura 


Chile 


Shuler, Mrs. Mildred C. 


Texas 


Sisson, Mrs. Alice Moore 


North Carolina 


Smith, Miss Cynthia Delores 


North Carolina 


Snell, Miss Marcia Ruth 


North Carolina 


Tessier, Paul Lee 


North Carolina 


Thompson, Miss Barbara Jewell 


New Jersey 


Torrey, Miss Evelyn Jeanne 


North Carolina 


Troutman, Miss Sarah Elysabeth 


North Carolina 


Verwoerdt, Mrs. Dorothy Taylor 


North Carolina 


Voss, Miss Anne Louise 


Ohio 


Wooten, Miss Mary Elizabeth 


North Carolina 


Worthy, Miss Emma Jean 


North Carolina 


Young, Miss Martha Paige 


North Carolina 



30 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



First-Year Students 
Student 

Aiken, Miss Lillian Rosemary 
Barnett, Miss Leigh 
Berne, Miss Julie Ann 
Blackman, Miss Constance Lynn 
Bock, Mrs. Alice Wells 
Boys, Mrs. Patricia Anne 
Brandt, Miss Nancy 
Brown, Paul D. 
Burns, Mrs. Mary Jane 
Copeland, Miss Joy M. 
Danna, Miss Cathy 
Deaton, Miss Lura Augusta 
Duncan, Miss Julia A. 
Everhart, Miss Frankie Lou 
Geren, Miss Juliana 
Gilmore, Raymond 
Graybeal, Miss Carol Ann 
Grubb, Charles 
Grumette, Mrs. Irene 
Harp, Dennis 
Hayden, Wilbur 
Heverling, Jock 
Hocking, Mrs. Marilyn 
Hocutt, Miss Sallie Ruth 
Holt, Miss Doris C. 
Jones, Miss Cynthia 
Kao, Chung-Chi 
Kelly, Mrs. Bettye S. 
Kesling, Mrs. Susan Oxford 
Knight, Kenneth B. 
Lambeth, Mrs. Diane Elkins 
Lang, Miss Gail 
Lawson, Miss Jan Robinson 
Lewis, Mrs. Judith H. 
Lewis, Mrs. Wanda T. Harvey 
Light, Miss Nancy Elizabeth 
Link, John 

Mallardi, Mrs. Susan Roszel 
Martyn, Miss Ann Henderson 
Matthews, Mitchell 
Modlin, Mrs. Carol Ann 
Morris, Miss Sarah Frances 
Munson, Karl 

Neighbors, Mrs. Nancy Fowlkes 
Oleson, Willard 
Perrotta, Eugene 
Partin, Mrs. Marilyn Jean 



State of Residence 

North Carolina 
Virginia 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Texas 

North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Maryland 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania 
California 
North Carolina 
Washington 
Michigan 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Maryland 
Taiwan 

North Carolina 
California 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
Delaware 
North Carolina 
Louisiana 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 
Utah 

New Jersey 
North Carolina 




The School of Social Work 



31 



student 


State of Residence 


Patterson, Paul 


North Carolina 


Penson, Miss Jessica 


Virginia 


Raffel, Miss Elaine A. 


Virginia 


Rice, Mrs. Stephanie Warner 


Maryland 


Rolett, Mrs. Karin C. 


Sweden 


Schulze, Miss Thea 


North Carolina 


Shao, Ching-Ming 


Taiwan 


Sumner, Eugene 


North Carolina 


Taylor, Miss Martha Lee 


Delaware 


Thaxton, Mrs. Elizabeth Dyer 


North Carolina 


Warlick, Miss Evelyn F. 


Maryland 


Wei, We-hsiung 


Taiwan 


Wheeler, Miss Jean J. 


Virginia 


White, Mrs. Margaret Balfe 


North Carolina 


Wood, Miss June Carolyn 


North Carolina 


Zarzar, Miss Greta Norma 


North Carolina 



32 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Work-Study Students* 
Asheville 

Bolick, Mrs. Lynn M. 
Bradley, Jimmy Leon 
Burns, Mrs. Ninette Propst 
Burt, Miss Patricia Miller 
Carroll, Mrs. Jerel Johnson 
Cole, Mrs. Patricia B. 
Eller, Joseph Roy 



Harris, Miss Linda Schell 
McKesson, Miss Artie Mae 
Orndoff, Graham Michael 
Sagar, William Sutcliffe 
Savage, Mrs. Marian Cabe 
Simpson, Miss Sandra Kay 



Charlotte 

Broome, Mrs. Charlene Crumpley 
Forester, Mrs. Carol Southard 
Gatford, Miss Dorothy Loraine 
Hollis, Mrs. Barbara McKinley 
Howard, Mrs. Tina Ussery 
Jones, Wayne Charlesworth 
Lamb, Mrs. Martha Andrus 
Lamb, William 
Little, Mrs. Evelyn Vannoy 
Martin, Miss Frankie Rose 



Martin, Mrs. Mary S. 
Moss, Mrs. Marion Brigman 
Newman, Mrs. Linda Williams 
Peele, Mrs. Ann Cassidy 
Petlitz, Stephen Gordon 
Prince, Miss Anne Maurice 
Redfern, Mrs. Agnes McNeely 
Reitz, Mrs. Sandra Thompson 
Thompson, Albert E., Jr. 
Vogel, Mrs. Jacqueline Paris 



Greensboro 

Banks, Mrs. Hilda Watson 
Bradley, Mrs. Judith Chappell 
Brinson, Vance Burton, Jr. 
Davis, Miss Rebecca Thompson 
Gilliam, Mrs. Yatesy Cantrell 



Jenkins, Mrs. Emelyne Gumm 
Parks, Clarence Banner 
Tobin, Mrs. Bonnie Ward 
Walker, Mrs. Frances McCraw 



Wilmington 

Blair, Mrs. Juanita Woodhouse 
Bradley, Mrs. Evelyn Penn 
Brooks, Harry Dean 
Harrell, Mrs. Jewell Hill 
Johnson, Robert Clyde, Jr. 



Piner, Mrs. Lucille Britton 
Ryder, Mrs. Everett Warren 
Taylor, Edward Franklin 
Teachey, Mrs. Lynne B. 



All work-study students are residents of North Carolina. 



The School of Social Work 



33 



EXCERPTS FROM UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 

Residence Status for Tuition Payment 1 

1. General. The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less 
than for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident must have 
maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least the twelve months next 
preceding the date of first enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of 
higher education in this state.- Student status in an institution of higher 
education in this state shall not constitute eligibility for residence to qualify 
said student for in-state tuition. 

2. Minors: A minor is any person who has not reached the age of eighteen 
years. :{ The legal residence of a person under eighteen years of age at the 
time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in this state 
is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. In cases where 
parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal residence of the father 
will control unless custody of the minor has been awarded by court to the 
mother or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim of residence in 
North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian in North Carolina will be 
considered if either parent is living unless the action of the court appointing 
the guardian antedates the student's first enrollment in a North Carolina 
institution of higher education by at least twelve months. 

3. Adults: An adult is any person who has reached the age of eighteen 
years. Persons, eighteen or more years of age at the time of first enrollment 
in an institution of higher education, are responsible for establishing their 
own domicile. Persons reaching the age of eighteen, whose parents are and 
have been domiciled in North Carolina for at least the preceding twelve 
months, retain North Carolina residence for tuition payment purposes until 
domicile in North Carolina is abandoned. If North Carolina residence is aban- 
doned by an adult, maintenance of North Carolina domicile for twelve months 
as a non-student is required to regain in-state status for tuition payment 
purposes. 

4. Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that of her 
husband, except that a woman currently enrolled as an in-state student in an 
institution of higher education may continue as a resident even though she 
marries a nonresident. If the husband is a nonresident and separation or 
divorce occurs, the woman may qualify for in-state tuition after establishing 
her domicile in North Carolina for at least twelve months as a non-student. 



1. These regulations, as amended on August 13, 1971, shall be applicable with 
respect to tuition payments coming due after said date. 

2. The reference in this sentence to "twelve months" formerly read "six 
months"; Chapter 845 of the 1971 Session Laws, which was ratified on July 13, 1971, 
made the change from "six months" to "twelve months." The office of the Attorney 
General has rendered the following opinion: 

'The eligibility of all students who have applied and have been accepted by 
state-supported institutions of higher education prior to July 13, 1971, shall be deter- 
mined upon the individual having maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at 
least the six months next preceding the date of first enrollment or re-enrollment in 
an institution of higher education in this State. The twelve-month requirement as 
provided for in Chapter 845 of the 1971 Session Laws does not apply to any indi- 
vidual who applied for admission and was accepted by a state-supported institution 
of higher education prior to July 13, 1971. The student already enrolled as an in-state 
student, qualifying as such by compliance with the six-month requirement prior to 
July 13, 1971, shall retain in-state status.' 

3. Chapter 585 of the 1971 Session Laws, which became effective on July 5, 1971, 
changed the age of adulthood from twenty-one years to eighteen years. 



34 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



5. Military Personnel: No person shall lose his in-state resident status by 
serving in the Armed Forces outside of the State of North Carolina. A member 
of the Armed Forces may obtain in-state residence status for himself, his 
spouse, or his children after maintaining his domicile in North Carolina for at 
least the twelve months next preceding his or their enrollment or re-enrollment 
in an institution of higher education in this state. 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent 
residence may establish North Carolina residence in the same manner as any 
other nonresident. 

7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to 
the State of North Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one 
for the in-state tuition rate. 

8. Change of Status: The residence status of any student is determined 
as of the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in 
North Carolina except: (a) in the case of a nonresident student at the time of 
first enrollment who has subsequently maintained domicile as a non-student 
for at least twelve consecutive months and (b) in the case of a resident who 
abandons his legal residence in North Carolina. In either case, the appropriate 
tuition rate will become effective at the beginning of the first subsequent 
term enrolled. 

9. Responsibility of Students: Any student or prospective student in doubt 
concerning his residence status must bear the responsibility for securing a 
ruling by stating his case in writing to the admissions officer. The student 
who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification, 
whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of 
immediately informing the Office of Admissions of this circumstance in writing. 
Failure to give complete and correct information regarding residence consti- 
tutes grounds for disciplinary action. 

10. Appeals of Rulings of Admission Officers: Any student or prospective 
student may appeal the ruling of the admissions officer in writing to the Chan- 
cellor of the institution. The Chancellor may use any officer or committee 
which he deems appropriate in review of the appeal. Appeal of the Chancellor's 
ruling may be made to the President of the University; such appeals to be 
filed with the Chancellor and forwarded by him to the President. 

Policies , Procedures, and Disciplinary Actions 
In Cases of Disruption of Educational Process 

The following statement has been incorporated in the By-Laws of the Board 
of Trustees of the University, and is quoted for the information of all members 
of the University Community. 

Section 5-1. Policies Relating to Disruptive Conduct 

The University of North Carolina has long honored the right of free dis- 
cussion and expression, peaceful picketing and demonstrations, the right to 
petition and peaceably to assemble. That these rights are a part of the fabric 
of this institution is not questioned. They must remain secure. It is equally 
clear, however, that in a community of learning willful disruption of the edu- 
cational process, destruction of property, and interference with the rights of 



The School of Social Work 



35 



other members of the community cannot be tolerated. Accordingly, it shall be 
the policy of the University to deal with any such disruption, destruction or 
interference promptly and effectively, but also fairly and impartially without 
regard to race, religion, sex or political beliefs. 

Section 5-2. Definition of Disruptive Conduct 

(a) Any faculty member (the term "faculty member," wherever used in this 
Chapter V, shall include regular faculty members, full-time instructors, lec- 
turers, and all other persons exempt from the North Carolina State Personnel 
System [Chapter 126 of the General Statutes as amended] who receive com- 
pensation for teaching, or other instructional functions, or research at the 
University), any graduate student engaged in the instructional program, or any 
student who, with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any normal operation or 

; function of the University or any of its component institutions, engages, or 
incites others to engage, in individual or collective conduct which destroys 
or significantly damages any University property, or which impairs or threatens 
impairment of the physical well-being of any member of the University com- 
munity, or which, because of its violent, forceful, threatening or intimidating 
nature or because it restrains freedom of lawful movement, otherwise prevents 

i any member of the University community from conducting his normal activities 
within the University, shall be subject to prompt and appropriate disciplinary 
action, which may include suspension, expulsion, discharge or dismissal from 

: the University. 

The following, while not intended to be exclusive, illustrate the offenses 
encompassed herein, when done for the purpose of obstructing or disrupting 
any normal operation or function of the University or any of its component 
institutions: (1) occupation of any University building or part thereof with 
intent to deprive others of its normal use; (2) blocking the entrance or exit of 

s i any University building or corridor or room therein with intent to deprive others 
of lawful access to or from, or use of, said building or corridor or room; (3) 
setting fire to or by any other means destroying or substantially damaging any 
University building or property, or the property of others on University prem- 
ises; (4) any possession or display of, or attempt or threat to use, for any un- 
lawful purpose, any weapon, dangerous instrument, explosive, or inflammable 
material in any University building or on any University campus; (5) prevention 

• of, or attempt to prevent by physical act, the attending, convening, continuation 
or orderly conduct of any University class or activity or of any lawful meeting 
or assembly in any University building or on any University campus; and (6) 
blocking normal pedestrian or vehicular traffic on or into any University 
campus. 

(b) Any person engaged in the instructional program who fails or refuses to 
; carry out validly assigned duties, with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any 

normal operation or function of the University or any of its component insti- 
tutions, shall be subject to prompt and appropriate disciplinary action under 
this Chapter V if (but only if) his status is such that he is not subject to the 
orovisions of Section 4-3 of Chapter IV. 

Section 5-3. Responsibilities of Chancellors 

(a) When any Chancellor has cause to believe that any of the provisions of 
ihis Chapter V have been violated, he shall forthwith investigate or cause to be 



36 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



investigated the occurrence, and upon identification of the parties involved 
shall promptly determine whether any charge is to be made with respect 
thereto. 

(b) If he decides that a charge is to be made, he shall, within thirty (30) 
days after he has information as to the identity of the alleged perpetrator of 
the offense but in no event more than twelve (12) months after the occurrence 
of the alleged offense, (i) refer the case to the appropriate existing University 
judicial body, or (ii) refer the matter to a Hearing Committee drawn from a 
previously selected Hearings Panel which, under this option, is required to 
implement action for violation of Section 5-2 (a) or (b) of this Chapter. If the 
case is referred to an existing University judicial body under (i) above, the 
procedural rules of that body shall be followed, and subsections (c) through 
(f) below shall not be applicable. If the matter is referred to a Hearing Com- 
mittee under (ii) above, the procedural rules prescribed in subsections (c) 
through (f) below shall be followed. 

(c) The accused shall be given written notice by personal service or regis- 
tered mail, return receipt requested, stating: 

(1) The specific violations of this Chapter V with which the accused is 
charged. 

(2) The designated time and place of the hearing on the charge by the 
Hearing Committee, which time shall not be earlier than seven (7) nor 
later than ten (10) days following receipt of the notice. 

(3) That the accused shall be entitled to the presumption of innocence 
until found guilty, the right to retain counsel, the right to present the 
testimony of witnesses and other evidence, the right to cross-examine 
all witnesses against him, the right to examine all documents and 
demonstrative evidence adverse to him, and the right to a transcript 
of the proceedings of the hearing. 

(d) The Hearing Committee shall determine the guilt or innocence of the 
accused. If the person charged is found guilty, the Hearing Committee shall 
recommend to the Chancellor such discipline as said body determines to be 
appropriate. After considering such recommendation the Chancellor shall pre- 
scribe such discipline as he deems proper. In any event, whether the person 
is found guilty or not guilty, a written report shall be made by the Chancellor 
to the President within ten (10) days. 

(e) Any person found guilty shall have ten (10) days after notice of such 
finding in which to appeal to the President of the University. Such an appeal 
if taken shall be upon the grounds set forth in Section 5-5. 

(f) Any accused person, who, without good cause, shall fail to appear at 
the time and place fixed for the hearing of his case by the Hearing Committee 
shall be suspended indefinitely or discharged from University employment. 

(g) A Chancellor, unless so ordered or otherwise prevented by court, shall 
not be precluded from carrying out his duties under this Chapter V by reason 
of any pending action in any State or Federal Court. Should a delay occur in ' 
prosecuting the charge against the accused because the accused or witnesses 
that may be necessary to a determination of the charge are involved in State 
or Federal court actions, the time limitations set forth above in this Section 
5-3 shall not apply. 



The School of Social Work 



37 



(h) Conviction in any State or Federal court shall not preclude the Uni- 
versity or any of its officers from exercising disciplinary action in any offense 
referred to in this Chapter V. 

(i) Nothing contained in this Chapter V shall preclude the President or any 
Chancellor from taking any other steps, including injunctive relief or other 
legal action, which he may deem advisable to protect the best interests of the 
University. 

Section 5-4. Aggravated Acts or Threatened Repetition of Acts 

(a) The Chancellor of each of the component institutions of the University 
shall appoint an Emergency Consultative Panel which shall be composed of 
not less than three (3) nor more than five (5) faculty members and not less 
than three (3) nor more than five (5) students who shall be available to advise 
with the Chancellor in any emergency. No member of such Panel shall serve 
for more than one (1) year unless he be reappointed by the Chancellor. The 
Chancellor may make appointments, either temporary or for a full year, to fill 

; any vacancies which may exist on the Panel. 

(b) If, in the judgment of the Chancellor, there is clear and convincing 
evidence that a person has committed any of the acts prohibited under this 
Chapter V which, because of the aggravated character or probable repetition 
of such act or acts, necessitates immediate action to protect the University 
from substantial interference with any of its orderly operations or functions, or 

I to prevent threats to or acts which endanger life or property, the Chancellor, 
with the concurrence as hereinafter provided of the Emergency Consultative 
Panel established pursuant to (a) above, may forthwith suspend such person 
from the University and bar him from the University campus, provided, how- 
| ever, that in the event of such suspension the person suspended shall be given 
written notice of the reason for his suspension, either personally or by regis- 
tered mail addressed to his last known addresses, and shall be afforded a 
prompt hearing, which, if requested, shall be commenced within ten (10) days 
1 [of the suspension. Except for purposes of attending personally any hearings 
conducted under this Chapter V, the bar against the appearance of the accused 
on the University campus shall remain in effect until final judgment has been 
Tendered in his case and all appellant proceedings have been concluded, 
'unless such restriction is earlier lifted by written notice from the Chancellor. 

(c) A quorum of the Emergency Consultative Panel provided for in (a) 
above shall consist of not less than four (4) of its members, and the required 
concurrence shall have been obtained if a majority of such quorum shall indi- 
cate their concurrence. The Chancellor shall meet personally with members 

tjof such Panel at the time he seeks concurrence, if it is feasible to do so. 
However, if the circumstances are such that the Chancellor deems it not to be 
feasible to personally assemble such members, then he may communicate 

[with them or the required number of them individually by telephone or by 
such other means as he may choose to employ, in which event he may proceed 
as provided in (b) above after the required majority of such members have 
communicated their concurrence to him. 

(d) In the Chancellor's absence or inability to act, the President may 
pxercise the powers of the Chancellor specified in this Section 5-4 in the same 
nanner and to the same extent as could the Chancellor but for such absence 

I pr inability to act. 



38 



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



Section 5-5. Right of Appeal 

Any person found guilty of violating the provisions of this Chapter V by the 
Hearing Committee referred to in Section 5-3 shall have the right to appeal 
the finding and the discipline imposed upon him to the President of the 
University. Any such appeal shall be in writing, shall be based solely upon the 
record, and shall be limited to one or more of the following grounds: 

(1) That the finding is not supported by substantial evidence; 

(2) That a fair hearing was not accorded the accused; or 

(3) That the discipline imposed was excessive or inappropriate. 

It shall be the responsibility of the President to make prompt disposition of 
all such appeals, and his decision shall be rendered within thirty (30) days 
after receipt of the complete record on appeal. 

Section 5-6. No Amnesty 

No administrative official, faculty member, or student of the University 
shall have authority to grant amnesty or to make any promise as to prosecution 
or non-prosecution in any court, State or Federal, or before any student, faculty, 
administrative, or Trustee committee to any person charged with or suspected 
of violating Section 5-2 (a) or (b) of these By-Laws. 

Section 5-7. Publication 

The provisions of this Chapter V shall be given wide dissemination in such 
manner as the President or Chancellors may deem advisable, and shall be 
printed in the official catalogues which may be issued by each component 
institution of the University. 

Procedures For Use In Case of Refusal By Graduate Student 
Service Appointees Who Are Not Subject To Code Section 4-3 
To Perform Validly Assigned Duties 

The following statement has been promulgated by the University Adminis- 
tration and is quoted for the information of all members of the University 
Community. 

In the event that any graduate student fails or refuses to carry out validly 
assigned duties with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any normal operation or 
function of the University, the procedures given below will be followed. In 
these procedures the term "dean" identifies the deans of professional schools. 

I. Administrative Procedures 

1. The dean or department chairman in whose school or department the 
graduate student is appointed will immediately inquire into the alleged 
conduct. He shall, in writing, notify the graduate student involved that 
he is beginning an inquiry into the alleged conduct, which shall be 
briefly described. On the basis of his inquiry, he shall make a concise 
written finding of fact with respect to whether it appears that there did 
occur a failure or refusal to carry out validly assigned duties with the 
intent to obstruct or disrupt any normal operation or function of the 
University. He shall transmit one copy of the finding to the Chancellor 
and one to the graduate student involved. 

2. If the inquiry indicates that the graduate student has failed or refused 
to carry out validly assigned duties with the intent to obstruct or disrupt 



The School of Social Work 



39 



any normal operation or function of the University, then the dean or 
chairman shall suspend the graduate student with pay from all duties 
until (a) the Chancellor has determined that no charge is to be made 
with respect thereto or (b) a final decision with respect thereto has been 
reached following a hearing before the body to which the matter is 
referred by the Chancellor. 
3. If the Chancellor decides that a charge is to be made with respect to 
the matter and that it is to be referred to the appropriate existing Uni- 
versity judicial body (rather than to the Hearing Committee referred to 
in Code Section 5-3), it shall be handled in the manner set forth below. 

II. Hearing Procedures 

1. The dean or chairman shall convene by written directive to the Griev- 
ance Committee set up by faculty action on January 10, 1969 (see 
Appendix B of Faculty Legislation). 

2. The dean or chairman shall, in writing, notify the graduate student of 
the convening of the hearing committee and shall provide the chairman 
of the hearing committee with a concise written summary of the charges 
of violation based upon the findings of the inquiry. 

3. Upon convening of the hearing committee and receipt of the written 
charges, the chairman of the hearing committee shall forthwith set a 
time and place for the hearing by written notification to the graduate 
student and shall make the necessary arrangements for conducting the 
hearing. Unless manifestly impossible for reasons of specific unfairness 
to the graduate student or gross inconvenience to members of the hear- 
ing committee or to necessary witnesses, the hearing shall be set to 
commence not later than five (5) days after receipt by the graduate 
student of the written notice of the convening of the hearing committee. 
Failure on the part of the graduate student to attend the hearing with- 
out adequate cause shall result in automatic permanent suspension 
without pay. 

4. The hearing shall be conducted on the written charges to determine 
their truth or falsity. The department chairman or dean who initiated 
the proceedings has the responsibility for presenting witnesses or docu- 
mentary evidence to establish the charges. The graduate student shall 
be accorded the right to counsel of his own choosing, to confront and 
cross-examine the witnesses against him, and to examine all documents 
and demonstrative evidence against him. He shall have the right to 
present testimony of witnesses and other evidence in his own behalf. 

5. A complete transcript of the proceedings shall be furnished at the 
expense of the University. 

6. Promptly upon the close of the hearing, the hearing committee shall 
render its decision, and that decision shall be presented in writing to 
the graduate student and his department chairman or dean. 

III. Disciplinary Action and Appeal Procedure 

1. If the decision is adverse to the graduate student, the department chair- 
man or dean who initiated the proceedings shall determine what disci- 
plinary action is to be taken. 



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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



2. An appeal may be taken in the manner described in paragraph C of 
Appendix B to the Faculty Legislation on University Government. 

Firearms and Other Weapons Prohibited 

The possession of bowie knives, dirks, daggers, loaded canes, sword canes, 
machetes, pistols, rifles, repeating rifles, shotguns, pump guns, or other fire- 
arms or explosives upon any University campus or in any University owned or 
operated facility, unless explicitly permitted by the appropriate Chancellor or 
his designated representative in writing, is forbidden. Violation of this pro- 
hibition constitutes grounds for suspension from the University.